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Posts Tagged ‘Ultra’

Finish Line Friday: Because I Can

October 3rd, 2014

As you probably know, the staff here at Running Warehouse consists largely of runners. We range from recreational runners, who use running as a tool by which to get (and stay) fit to Olympic qualifying competitive runners who are always looking for their next PR. It’s a beautiful spectrum.

Every other Friday, I’m asking one member of our staff: What drives you? What motivates you to be the best runner you can be? What keeps you going when you feel like calling it a day? What gets you to the finish line? Our goal is to help inspire you to keep going, train harder, dig a little deeper and cross the finish line.

Today, Tera will be sharing her personal sources of inspiration.

Tera

Current Position: Retail Manager

Running background:
I began running in middle school doing track in the spring. In high school, I ran on the XC and track team for Campolindo in Moraga, CA. Got a bit burned out after high school and decided to take college off. I did, however, get motivated to jump into the occasional 5k/10k during that time. Post college, I ended up being an assistant coach for a few years and became more and more motivated to run competitively again. Did my first 1/2 marathon at (I think) age 24 and first marathon at 26.

After meeting Erik (who is now my husband) and he was doing ultras, I figured a 50k wouldn’t be much different than a marathon and seemed much more enjoyable on the trails. So I did my first 50k shortly after being married, at the age of 29. After that, I was hooked! I had found my calling and much preferred the trails over the roads and the overall community of the ultra world. Though there is something about running fast and getting a personal best that still has me coming back. The year after I ran my first 100 miler (with my first daughter in utero!) I set a PR in the marathon 2:59 at CIM. Since then, I PR’d again with a 2:57 at the age of 39 (I think and that was after having daughter #2).

Tera and Dusty at the Western States 100 miler, June 2014

What inspires you?
Well, a lot has to do with just pushing myself to see what I’m capable of and not being complacent or settling for less than what I think I’m capable of. I do look up to women that are in their 50′s and still kicking butt, like Meghan Arbogast (ultra runner) and local, Linda Somers Smith. I feel fortunate that I can pull from a ton of inspiration. Here are just a few: I have a father with Parkinson’s, I lost a really good running buddy this year who also happened to be my pacer at Western States in June, I have two really awesome daughters, a great job with great people, a bunch of running partners that are willing to run with me at all times of the day/night, and a supportive husband that constantly keeps me focused and grounded.

All these things, and many more, are what I think about when the going gets tough. If I can’t put one foot in front of the other to just cross a finish line, then I feel like I’m not only letting myself down, but all those people in my life, or those that are no longer here. It’s not just a personal accomplishment, but a whole lot of support from so many people that goes into it. If I can’t make it to the finish line, it’s going to be because I am physically unable, not for a lack of determination.

One silly motivational quote I’ve used lately is “the faster you run, the sooner you’re done”. It works and it’s really true. When you are running 100 miles, it’s really hard to keep the negative thoughts out of your head. It’s pretty much impossible. I usually question why I’m doing this a million times. It’s a really simple answer though, I do it because I can. I’m just fortunate that way I suppose.

Tera Dube

Tera atop Cuesta grade while training

What are you training for now, and what do you refuel with post workout?
My next 100 miler. I’m extremely motivated to master the 100′s, even if it puts me in my grave, ha ha. I know I have more to contribute to this distance and I’m not willing to give up yet. After almost every run I do, I use FLUID recovery (chocolate) with half a frozen banana and rice milk.

Thanks Tera!

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The Badwater Run carries on without the Badwater

July 23rd, 2014
Badwater Run Champion

Harvey Lewis, victor of the race and the terrain. (Photo: Chris Kostman, Instagram)

The Badwater Ultra Marathon, dubbed “the most difficult run in the world”, was won by Harvey Lewis in a time of 23:52:55. Lewis, a teacher at the Cincinnati School for Creative and Performing Arts, covered the 135 miles of California high desert over 50 minutes quicker than his nearest competitor, Grant Maughan of Australia. Alyson Venti, an Oceanography Ph.D. student from University of Miami won the women’s race in 28:37:28.

The course, famous for traveling from the lowest point in North America, Badwater, to the trailhead of the highest mountain in the contiguous United States, Mount Whitney, changed drastically this year due to permitting issues within Death Valley National Park. Over 30 years of safe  and successful events were held in the park by Badwater’s parent company AdventureCORPS. They also host an equally crazy 508 mile bike race from the California coast into Death Valley. The Park suspended all event permits to conduct a safety audit, forcing the Badwater run to start somewhere other than Badwater or be cancelled.

Read more…

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