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Posts Tagged ‘Ultra’

Finish Line Friday: Push Yourself

December 12th, 2014

Our goal is to help inspire you to keep going, train harder, dig a little deeper and cross the finish line. For this week’s FLF, Erik will be sharing his personal sources of inspiration.

Erik

Erik Dube

Current Position: I’ve worked at Running Warehouse for the past 7.5 years and am currently a footwear buyer.

Favorite Part of the Job: The best part of this job is seeing and testing all of the latest footwear before it arrives on the shelves.

Running Background: I’ve been a runner for 27 years. I ran cross country and track & field in high school and college. Right after college, I switched to trail ultras and have been doing that for the past 16 years. I also had the opportunity to coach at the high school level for 8 years.

What inspires you?
I can’t point to a single person who inspires me the most but it is a collection of people, events, and experiences over many years. I’ve come into contact with great people and have witnessed some extraordinary races over the past couple of decades. Combine those events along with the opportunity to run on scenic trails around the country and there is no lack of motivation to get out and push myself with training on a daily basis.

Erik Dube getting ready to cross the finish line of the Tahoe Rim Trail 100 miler in 2011.

Tahoe Rim Trail 100 miler, 2011

What are you training for now?
I just won a lottery spot into the 2015 Western States 100. It will be my 6th trip from Squaw Valley to Auburn. I hope to build on my streak of five sub-24 performances with a solid performance in June. Everything over the next six months will build to that race. The next race on my list is the Sean O’Brien 50k down in Malibu in February. I’m looking to a solid start to my 2015 schedule. I’m also hoping to get picked in the February lottery for the Wasatch 100 that takes place in September.

What do you refuel with post workout?
For post workout refueling I don’t have a strict routine. I try to get hydrated and get some nutrition quickly. After longer runs (above 15 miles) I usually make a smoothie with some Fluid Recovery Drink, Chocolate Wave.

Thanks, Erik!

Rachel Run Training, Uncategorized , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Finish Line Friday: Role Model

October 31st, 2014

Our goal is to help inspire you to keep going, train harder, dig a little deeper and cross the finish line. For this week’s Finish Line Friday, Kelsie will be sharing her personal sources of inspiration.

Kelsie

Current Position: Retail Customer Service Representative

Favorite Part of the Job: That excited feeling when I have helped a customer find their “perfect shoe”. I can’t help but smile, and feel happy that I have contributed in a small way to their enjoyment of the outdoors and a sport I love dearly.

Running Background:
I started running cross country and track in high school based off a family friend’s suggestion. It was so hard for me, but giving up on running never crossed my mind! My high school coach, and all her friends in the area were ultra-runners, so it seemed completely normal to me to spend all day Saturday on the trails or running through the night. I would beg Mary, my coach, to let me join her group of ultra-running friends on the “ninja” runs (12 miles through the Marin Headlands, often in darkness, once a week). I was only 16 at the time and loved every minute. I even paced her in a 100miler and thought it looked pretty easy.

Kelsie Clausen during the Courmayeur-Champex-Chamonix race.

Kelsie during the Courmayeur-Champex-Chamonix race

As a wide-eyed, young, and impressionable lover of trail running, I knew I had found my calling. After my freshman year of college, I ran a 50k trail race. It was a humbling, learning experience, but I was addicted. The longer the run, the more I get to experience the outdoors and explore. Since that race, I have competed in other 50k’s. I just finished my first 100k, the Courmayeur-Champex-Chamonix race around Mont Blanc in France at the age of 20 (youngest ever?!). These days, you can often find me jumping around on a trail, several wildflowers in my ponytail, and a big grin on my face.

What inspires you?
When I run, I am inspired by my surroundings. The beautiful weather, the next big hill, the allure of what is hiding behind a turn… these things push me forward. However, the biggest motivator for me is that I want to be a role model for other young female athletes.

I want to be the best I can be and gain a large audience in order to encourage other young females to pursue their dreams. I always want to have a positive attitude and put my best foot forward because I realize I am so incredibly lucky to be a part of the amazing, supportive community of ultra-running! On another note, when I went through a really low point in my Courmayeur-Champex-Chamonix race, about 28 miles in, I started singing along to Taylor Swift & Mulan on my iPod. It boosted my spirits and I resumed running uphill; passing many, many men!

Rory Bosio & Kelsie after an epic loop in the French Alps

Rory & Kelsie after an epic loop in the French Alps

As far as inspiring mentors and heroes go, any woman that constantly changes the rules, breaks the barriers and has a smile on her face is someone I look up to. Women like Ann Trason, winning Western States 14 times, Rory Bosio, an American winning UTMB 2x AND finishing 7th overall one year, or women in their 50′s like Meghan Arbogast, who are rocking World 100k’s faster than I can run 5k’s!

What are you training for now, and what do you refuel with post workout?
I am currently training for The North Face 50-miler in December and the Bandera 100k in January. I’m trying to earn a spot in Western States 100-mile!

Post workout, I try to refuel with a balanced meal of protein (usually eggs), fats (like avocados), and veggies. And lots of dark chocolate.

Thanks, Kelsie!

Rachel Uncategorized, Women's Running , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Finish Line Friday: Because I Can

October 3rd, 2014

As you probably know, the staff here at Running Warehouse consists largely of runners. We range from recreational runners, who use running as a tool by which to get (and stay) fit to Olympic qualifying competitive runners who are always looking for their next PR. It’s a beautiful spectrum.

Every other Friday, I’m asking one member of our staff: What drives you? What motivates you to be the best runner you can be? What keeps you going when you feel like calling it a day? What gets you to the finish line? Our goal is to help inspire you to keep going, train harder, dig a little deeper and cross the finish line.

Today, Tera will be sharing her personal sources of inspiration.

Tera

Current Position: Retail Manager

Running background:
I began running in middle school doing track in the spring. In high school, I ran on the XC and track team for Campolindo in Moraga, CA. Got a bit burned out after high school and decided to take college off. I did, however, get motivated to jump into the occasional 5k/10k during that time. Post college, I ended up being an assistant coach for a few years and became more and more motivated to run competitively again. Did my first 1/2 marathon at (I think) age 24 and first marathon at 26.

After meeting Erik (who is now my husband) and he was doing ultras, I figured a 50k wouldn’t be much different than a marathon and seemed much more enjoyable on the trails. So I did my first 50k shortly after being married, at the age of 29. After that, I was hooked! I had found my calling and much preferred the trails over the roads and the overall community of the ultra world. Though there is something about running fast and getting a personal best that still has me coming back. The year after I ran my first 100 miler (with my first daughter in utero!) I set a PR in the marathon 2:59 at CIM. Since then, I PR’d again with a 2:57 at the age of 39 (I think and that was after having daughter #2).

Tera and Dusty at the Western States 100 miler, June 2014

What inspires you?
Well, a lot has to do with just pushing myself to see what I’m capable of and not being complacent or settling for less than what I think I’m capable of. I do look up to women that are in their 50′s and still kicking butt, like Meghan Arbogast (ultra runner) and local, Linda Somers Smith. I feel fortunate that I can pull from a ton of inspiration. Here are just a few: I have a father with Parkinson’s, I lost a really good running buddy this year who also happened to be my pacer at Western States in June, I have two really awesome daughters, a great job with great people, a bunch of running partners that are willing to run with me at all times of the day/night, and a supportive husband that constantly keeps me focused and grounded.

All these things, and many more, are what I think about when the going gets tough. If I can’t put one foot in front of the other to just cross a finish line, then I feel like I’m not only letting myself down, but all those people in my life, or those that are no longer here. It’s not just a personal accomplishment, but a whole lot of support from so many people that goes into it. If I can’t make it to the finish line, it’s going to be because I am physically unable, not for a lack of determination.

One silly motivational quote I’ve used lately is “the faster you run, the sooner you’re done”. It works and it’s really true. When you are running 100 miles, it’s really hard to keep the negative thoughts out of your head. It’s pretty much impossible. I usually question why I’m doing this a million times. It’s a really simple answer though, I do it because I can. I’m just fortunate that way I suppose.

Tera Dube

Tera atop Cuesta grade while training

What are you training for now, and what do you refuel with post workout?
My next 100 miler. I’m extremely motivated to master the 100′s, even if it puts me in my grave, ha ha. I know I have more to contribute to this distance and I’m not willing to give up yet. After almost every run I do, I use FLUID recovery (chocolate) with half a frozen banana and rice milk.

Thanks Tera!

Rachel Running Sport, Women's Running , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Badwater Run carries on without the Badwater

July 23rd, 2014
Badwater Run Champion

Harvey Lewis, victor of the race and the terrain. (Photo: Chris Kostman, Instagram)

The Badwater Ultra Marathon, dubbed “the most difficult run in the world”, was won by Harvey Lewis in a time of 23:52:55. Lewis, a teacher at the Cincinnati School for Creative and Performing Arts, covered the 135 miles of California high desert over 50 minutes quicker than his nearest competitor, Grant Maughan of Australia. Alyson Venti, an Oceanography Ph.D. student from University of Miami won the women’s race in 28:37:28.

The course, famous for traveling from the lowest point in North America, Badwater, to the trailhead of the highest mountain in the contiguous United States, Mount Whitney, changed drastically this year due to permitting issues within Death Valley National Park. Over 30 years of safe  and successful events were held in the park by Badwater’s parent company AdventureCORPS. They also host an equally crazy 508 mile bike race from the California coast into Death Valley. The Park suspended all event permits to conduct a safety audit, forcing the Badwater run to start somewhere other than Badwater or be cancelled.

Read more…

Scott Running Events , , , , ,