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Posts Tagged ‘ultra running’

Finish Line Friday: Role Model

October 31st, 2014

Our goal is to help inspire you to keep going, train harder, dig a little deeper and cross the finish line. For this week’s Finish Line Friday, Kelsie will be sharing her personal sources of inspiration.

Kelsie

Current Position: Retail Customer Service Representative

Favorite Part of the Job: That excited feeling when I have helped a customer find their “perfect shoe”. I can’t help but smile, and feel happy that I have contributed in a small way to their enjoyment of the outdoors and a sport I love dearly.

Running Background:
I started running cross country and track in high school based off a family friend’s suggestion. It was so hard for me, but giving up on running never crossed my mind! My high school coach, and all her friends in the area were ultra-runners, so it seemed completely normal to me to spend all day Saturday on the trails or running through the night. I would beg Mary, my coach, to let me join her group of ultra-running friends on the “ninja” runs (12 miles through the Marin Headlands, often in darkness, once a week). I was only 16 at the time and loved every minute. I even paced her in a 100miler and thought it looked pretty easy.

Kelsie Clausen during the Courmayeur-Champex-Chamonix race.

Kelsie during the Courmayeur-Champex-Chamonix race

As a wide-eyed, young, and impressionable lover of trail running, I knew I had found my calling. After my freshman year of college, I ran a 50k trail race. It was a humbling, learning experience, but I was addicted. The longer the run, the more I get to experience the outdoors and explore. Since that race, I have competed in other 50k’s. I just finished my first 100k, the Courmayeur-Champex-Chamonix race around Mont Blanc in France at the age of 20 (youngest ever?!). These days, you can often find me jumping around on a trail, several wildflowers in my ponytail, and a big grin on my face.

What inspires you?
When I run, I am inspired by my surroundings. The beautiful weather, the next big hill, the allure of what is hiding behind a turn… these things push me forward. However, the biggest motivator for me is that I want to be a role model for other young female athletes.

I want to be the best I can be and gain a large audience in order to encourage other young females to pursue their dreams. I always want to have a positive attitude and put my best foot forward because I realize I am so incredibly lucky to be a part of the amazing, supportive community of ultra-running! On another note, when I went through a really low point in my Courmayeur-Champex-Chamonix race, about 28 miles in, I started singing along to Taylor Swift & Mulan on my iPod. It boosted my spirits and I resumed running uphill; passing many, many men!

Rory Bosio & Kelsie after an epic loop in the French Alps

Rory & Kelsie after an epic loop in the French Alps

As far as inspiring mentors and heroes go, any woman that constantly changes the rules, breaks the barriers and has a smile on her face is someone I look up to. Women like Ann Trason, winning Western States 14 times, Rory Bosio, an American winning UTMB 2x AND finishing 7th overall one year, or women in their 50′s like Meghan Arbogast, who are rocking World 100k’s faster than I can run 5k’s!

What are you training for now, and what do you refuel with post workout?
I am currently training for The North Face 50-miler in December and the Bandera 100k in January. I’m trying to earn a spot in Western States 100-mile!

Post workout, I try to refuel with a balanced meal of protein (usually eggs), fats (like avocados), and veggies. And lots of dark chocolate.

Thanks, Kelsie!

Rachel Uncategorized, Women's Running , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Rob Krar is Becoming a Legend

August 18th, 2014

Rob Krar is at home in the mountains. (image: Denver Post)

Rob Krar is good at running 100-mile races through the mountains. In June, he took the Western States Endurance Run title and this past weekend he won the Leadville Trail 100, running the second fastest time in both races’ history. In conquering the Sierra Nevada and Rocky mountain ranges’ most storied ultra races, Rob has put himself on the map as one of the world’s best runners, something that would have been hard to predict for the former middle distance runner from the banks of Lake Ontario.

Rob has always been good at running. As a young track runner, Krar earned himself a scholarship at Butler University and boasts personal bests of 1:51 and 3:44 in the 800 and 1500 respectively. The Canadian native hardly has the prototypical background of an ultra marathon champion. Following his time at Butler, Rob moved to Phoenix to pursue a career as a pharmacist and mostly gave up competitive running. The city life in Phoenix wasn’t to Rob’s liking and when the opportunity to transfer to Flagstaff came along, Rob made the move.

Many runners have made their way to Flagstaff to log countless miles on the town’s endless mountain trails, but Rob ended up there by a different route. What was to be a short stint in Flagstaff to earn his pharmaceutical certifications, is now going on 8 years with no plans of leaving. Clearly, Rob also started lacing up the running shoes again.

Rob didn’t turn into an overnight champion. After running sparingly between his time at Butler and his arrival in Flagstaff (he graduated from Butler in 2001 and transferred from Phoenix to Flagstaff in 2006), his body had to adjust to training regularly again. It took a year or so before Rob’s running returned to form. At first, he took to the roads and notched personal bests of 2:25 in the marathon and 1:05 in the half marathon. Despite the competitive success, running on pavement took its toll physically and mentally and after extended time off for an injury to his heel that required surgery, he took to the trails in earnest. He has been destroying trail races since, from winning the Sportiva Mountain Cup in 2012 to his Leadville domination this weekend.

If Rob’s victory at Western States showed that Rob has arrived as a true ultra star, his win at Leadville showed that he’s not content to simply bask in his newfound stardom. Krar seems to have a genuine love for the trails and is more intent on covering as many miles as possible than chasing after adoration (Although his signature beard does have its own twitter account @RobKrarsBeard). For Rob, there is no rest for the weary as he is set to run Steamboat Springs’ Run Rabbit Run 100 mile race in less than a month. A win there would make for a truly legendary summer.

Scott Running Sport , , , ,

Running Chiropractor Talks Injury Prevention

August 15th, 2014

Dr. Dubrul crossing the finish line at Western States

Not every chiropractor uses their spare time to train for 100-mile races. In San Luis Obispo, the running community is fortunate to have a chiropractor with over 20 years of chiropractic experience that also knows what it takes to push his own body to the limit.

Running Warehouse caught up with Dr. Scott Dubrul asked him a few questions about chiropractic care for runners.

Running Warehouse: Where should Chiropractic care fit into a runner’s injury prevention and recovery? What are the key attributes to chiropractic care that separates the practice from other medical specialists or fitness professionals?

Scott Dubrul: Chiropractic care fits well in treating specific injuries as well as maintaining a healthy locomotion system. Chiropractic care should be sought out initially for evaluation of the spine, hips, knees and feet. If any areas are fixed and not moving properly, Chiropractic adjustments of those areas will restore motion and have them function properly.

Beyond the initial visit Chiropractic for runners is a “whole system” care. Chiropractic care works best in tandem with continual holistic health practices outside of the office visits. This includes making sure that other health specialists and any running coaches are complimenting the chiropractic care and advice. Of course, there are some chiropractors that are more specialized as far as sports go, so it is important to make sure the chiropractor chosen fits the runner’s needs.

Dr. Scott Dubrul: The Ultra Chiropractor

RW: Not everyone has access to medical specialists that also run and can relate to runners. This may lead to the dreaded “take time off running” recommendation and sometimes a non-runner may not appreciate that some injuries can be trained through if done with care. How do you suggest runners approach the topic without blatantly ignoring their medical practitioner?

SD: My suggestion to runners is to continue their activity while keeping me abreast of how they are feeling in regards to their injury. If they are able to continue during treatment with no increase in pain, they are usually good. I rarely have my patients take too much time off unless the injury is not healing and the activity makes it worse. All that said, it is important to have a good dialogue with your health care professional.

RW: How has your own running helped you with your chiropractic work? How has your work as a chiropractor and your training as a doctor helped you in your own running?

SD: I would say my own running has really helped me to know what can be run through and what should be an injury that requires time off running. In my experience, it is absolutely vital to do regular work on your own body in the form of core exercises, self-massage and stretching. A good regimen can stave off injury and keep you supple and ready to run. I have also learned that for me, if I have pain that doesn’t get worse when I run, I am better served to keep running.

Finally, I have learned that I cannot be my own doctor in every sense; so I work with other chiropractors, massage therapists, trainers and physical therapists regularly. Even with all my knowledge, I will still try to “fix” my own issues with no luck, only to have another professional work on me and fix me up quickly!

Running Warehouse would like to thank Dr. Dubrul for taking time to speak with us and offer his insights to runners. For more information regarding Dr. Dubrul’s practice, chiropractic care and injury prevention, visit: http://www.powersourcechiropractic.com/services/chiropractic-care/

Scott Run Training , , , ,

Another Generation of Hardrock Adventure

July 14th, 2014
    “Long distance” is an subjective concept. Long can mean a mile to some while others use marathons as “speed training.” However, the unifying quality of distance running, regardless of the distance, is adventure that accompanies the training, racing, and post race celebrating. You pick your poison, but you are rewarded with a story once you endure.

    With that, the Hardrock 100 Mile Endurance Run may stand-alone in the adventure classification.  Built in the footsteps of Rocky Mountain miners – the hardy exploring archetype of the western genre – this run makes no concessions to the weary. The 100 mile distance is only part of the challenge, with the average elevation atop the tree line of 11,000 feet. Not to mention that runners are exposed to extra weather-related variables without sufficient oxygen to process their plight.

    Katie DeSplinter took this amazing picture of a Hardrocker. (found at hardrock100.com)

    Read more…

Scott Running Events , , ,

Western States Endurance Run: 100 Miles of Prestige (and Running)

June 26th, 2014

A 24-hour Completion = Silver Buckle Award. Photo: TNF & Runner's World, 2006

Claiming one’s self as the most prestigious anything is a bold statement. It’s one that comes with the risk of backlash if expectations are left unmet. It generally takes years of experience, as well as talent and ingenuity, to back up such a claim. At that, the Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run, “the worlds oldest and most prestigious 100-mile trail race,” makes the claim unabashedly and accurately.

The race has set the bar for ultra running around the world over its 41 year history. The race started when Gordy Ainsleigh decided to complete the Western States Trail Ride, an event testing the endurance of our equine friends, sans horse. The race has been challenging the limits of runners ever since.

Read more…

Scott Running Sport , ,

For Your Enjoyment: Taking On The Brazil 135

April 10th, 2014

The Brazil 135 is one of four events within the Badwater World Cup. The 135-mile race covers the part of the Caminho da Fé (Walk of Faith) in São Paulo every January.

41-year-old Josh Spector took on the Brazil 135 this year, and he brought his GoPro along to document the journey.

In his narration, Spector explains the struggles of taking on a race of such distance, both physical – the blistering, the fatigue, the wear and tear on the body – and psychological – the loneliness and battling the will to just stop. Yet Spector endures on, and he does so for a simple reason – his love of running.

To this love, I think all of us runners can relate.

[via Buzzfeed]

Taro Running Sport ,