Running Chiropractor Talks Injury Prevention

August 15th, 2014

Dr. Dubrul crossing the finish line at Western States

Not every chiropractor uses their spare time to train for 100-mile races. In San Luis Obispo, the running community is fortunate to have a chiropractor with over 20 years of chiropractic experience that also knows what it takes to push his own body to the limit.

Running Warehouse caught up with Dr. Scott Dubrul asked him a few questions about chiropractic care for runners.

Running Warehouse: Where should Chiropractic care fit into a runner’s injury prevention and recovery? What are the key attributes to chiropractic care that separates the practice from other medical specialists or fitness professionals?

Scott Dubrul: Chiropractic care fits well in treating specific injuries as well as maintaining a healthy locomotion system. Chiropractic care should be sought out initially for evaluation of the spine, hips, knees and feet. If any areas are fixed and not moving properly, Chiropractic adjustments of those areas will restore motion and have them function properly.

Beyond the initial visit Chiropractic for runners is a “whole system” care. Chiropractic care works best in tandem with continual holistic health practices outside of the office visits. This includes making sure that other health specialists and any running coaches are complimenting the chiropractic care and advice. Of course, there are some chiropractors that are more specialized as far as sports go, so it is important to make sure the chiropractor chosen fits the runner’s needs.

Dr. Scott Dubrul: The Ultra Chiropractor

RW: Not everyone has access to medical specialists that also run and can relate to runners. This may lead to the dreaded “take time off running” recommendation and sometimes a non-runner may not appreciate that some injuries can be trained through if done with care. How do you suggest runners approach the topic without blatantly ignoring their medical practitioner?

SD: My suggestion to runners is to continue their activity while keeping me abreast of how they are feeling in regards to their injury. If they are able to continue during treatment with no increase in pain, they are usually good. I rarely have my patients take too much time off unless the injury is not healing and the activity makes it worse. All that said, it is important to have a good dialogue with your health care professional.

RW: How has your own running helped you with your chiropractic work? How has your work as a chiropractor and your training as a doctor helped you in your own running?

SD: I would say my own running has really helped me to know what can be run through and what should be an injury that requires time off running. In my experience, it is absolutely vital to do regular work on your own body in the form of core exercises, self-massage and stretching. A good regimen can stave off injury and keep you supple and ready to run. I have also learned that for me, if I have pain that doesn’t get worse when I run, I am better served to keep running.

Finally, I have learned that I cannot be my own doctor in every sense; so I work with other chiropractors, massage therapists, trainers and physical therapists regularly. Even with all my knowledge, I will still try to “fix” my own issues with no luck, only to have another professional work on me and fix me up quickly!

Running Warehouse would like to thank Dr. Dubrul for taking time to speak with us and offer his insights to runners. For more information regarding Dr. Dubrul’s practice, chiropractic care and injury prevention, visit: http://www.powersourcechiropractic.com/services/chiropractic-care/

Scott Run Training , , , ,

Europe and Africa Crown Champions in 2014

August 14th, 2014

The second largest and second smallest continents on the planet are hosting their respective championships this week and there are a lot of great races yet to be run. The African Championships started on Sunday in Marrakech, Morocco and the European Championships took off yesterday.

Already storylines are developing as Nijel Amos of Botswana won yet another championship, cementing himself as the king of the 800m for the year, while Nigeria’s Blessing Okagbare continues to add to her own medal collection in the sprints. Marrakech has not treated all favorites equally as Genzebe Dibaba, who was unstoppable earlier this year during the indoor season, lost to fellow Ethiopian Almaz Ayana.

Isaac Makwala Runs a lap

Isaac Makwala ran the fastest lap around a track ever on African soil. (image: IAAF)

While Nijel Amos was able to dominate both the Commonwealth games and the African Championships, his countryman, Isaac Makwala had to recover from a disappointing Commonwealth appearance to win his title at the African Championships. The African record holder in the 400m came to Morrocco and won each of his heats before dominating the final and setting a record for fastest 400m on the African continent.

Pavey running

Jo Pavey leading the pack (Image: IAAF)

While Zurich has only seen action for two days, already there has been historic performances on the track beginning with Jo Pavey’s age defying win at 10,000 meters. The 40-year-old left her younger competitors behind and added a European gold medal to her Commonwealth silver medal less than a year from when she had a child. She is a truly great runner who happened to have to run in the shadow of World Marathon Record Holder and fellow Brit Paula Radcliff, so to see her continue to excel is a treat so many years later.

Mo Farah completed the British sweep of European 10,000m titles today in his first major track race of the season. After dominating the 5,000m and 10,000m over the past few years, he was the clear favorite but he has had a series of difficulties in preparing for the track season from before his collapse at the New York City Half Marathon back in March up to recently visiting the hospital for stomach issues. Given the circumstances, the win is impressive. It will be interesting to see how he responds to the tougher competition of late season track meets if he chooses to compete on the track in the coming months.

While those of us on this side of the Pacific Ocean are eagerly awaiting the chance for American track stars to get back to what they do best, we can all still follow their competitors in Morocco and Switzerland.

Scott Running News , , , ,

Robin Williams Remembered: Possibly the Funniest Former Track Star

August 12th, 2014
Robin Williams Ran before he flew

Robin Williams had to learn to run before he could fly. (photo: Ancestry.com)

“Our job is improving the quality of life, not just delaying death” (Patch Adams).

Robin Williams was a favorite of many, and like too many that give the world so much, he reached his own end too soon. Robin learned that sharing his authentic personality was the most valuable gift he could share. “You’re only given a little spark of madness. You mustn’t lose it.”

Surely us runners relate to this: our hobby (lifestyle, passion, obsession) often starts before the sun rises, our toenails have been forsaken, and we will be perpetually sore and semi-injured for the rest of our lives. Williams said, “You will have bad times, but they will always wake you up to the stuff you weren’t paying attention to.” Surely we can all relate to the never-doing-that-race-again-but-if-I-paced-myself-hydrated-trained-better-was-healthy…dialogue in our heads. But when the weariness has passed, we will pick ourselves up and let the madness resume.

Robin had troubles and his death is an extreme and unfortunate reminder of the “bad times” he may have been battling. He leaves behind a devastated family and a few unanswered questions, but more enduring, he gave us some of the favorite characters of our lifetime. From the man that taught us to love poetry in Dead Poet’s Society, the cross dressing dad-nanny that fooled everyone in Mrs. Doubtfire, the genuine mentor that worked to tame the insecure genius in Good Will Hunting, a voice of happiness for our troops in Good Morning, Vietnam (and in life, traveling to military bases around the world to entertain), a blue-opaque genie that demonstrated how putting others needs before your own is a far greater wish than personal wealth and fame in Aladdin, and the adult-ish version of Peter Pan who in saving his children rediscovers his own youth lost in Hook.

In his passing, we look back at his life and enjoy the gifts he shared even more deeply. Traveling farther back in time before any of these characters lived, Robin was a high school track runner. He was good too! With a sub 2 minute half mile to his credit, his skills extended beyond acting. While this is certainly only a tiny footnote in his biography, it highlights the diversity that the running world can call its own. If one can draw some unfounded causation from a correlation, it may show that the same patience it takes to weather his personal ups and downs translated into breaking barriers with his feet.

So while we all wish that our favorite Genie might have waited a touch longer to take his own Magic Carpet for a ride, we can certainly be grateful for what he did give us and that he too wore shorts too short at one point.

Scott Uncategorized ,

Skyrunning takes to the Alps: Sierre-Zinal

August 11th, 2014
Run Zinal trail

Breathless Mountain Running: The Alps' Finest. (image: EveryTrail)

From our home on the pacific, the closest many of us Californians come to a true adventure in the Alps is a ride down the Matterhorn Bobsleds ride at Disneyland. With countless races in the United States worthy of any runner-traveler’s bucket list, it is easy for Americans to forget about the rest of the world. However, the Sierre–Zinal trail race through the Alpine wonderland of South-Eastern Switzerland is worthy of our attention for its beauty alone. The course features views of some of the most renowned peaks of the alps: Zinalrothorn, Obel Gabelhorn, Dent Blanche, and of course the Matterhorn in real life. Doug Meyer of Run the Alps does a better job describing this magical race than I do in his blog here.

The race, which celebrated its 40th birthday last year, is hardly content to let its panoramic scenery be the only draw and many of the world’s best trail runners are invited each year to take part in the festivities. The course is crafted in a way that no particular skillset is favored and runners from a variety of backgrounds can find their way to the podium. At 31 kilometers, the race is hardly a sprint but it is short enough that the field is not exclusively seasoned ultra runners. There is some highly technical terrain that requires dexterity and the ability to adapt to a quad-burning crawl, but there are also much smoother sections of dirt road that reward runners that can handle a swifter pace.

Joe Grey had an awesome race on a course that suits his many talents. (image: Skyrunning.com)

Stevie and Kilian are midway through very successful seasons. (image: Skyrunning.com)

Where there are advanced trails and elite competition, the venerable Kilian Jornet always seems to be involved. This race was no different as Killian rose to the top for the seventh time this year in a world-class trail race. This time, American Jo Grey from Washington appeared to give him a challenge until the final 4km of the race but Kilian was able to open up over a minute on Joe before they eventually crossed the finish.

Americans did well on the podium, in addition to Grey’s silver, as Stevie Kremer of Colorado took the women’s race after a pair of second place finishes prior to Sunday. With her second win on the Skyrunning circuit she now has the lead with 3 of 5 races complete.

The Skyracing series continues in the Swiss Alps with the Matterhorn Ultraks on August 23rd and concludes with the Limone extreme race in the beautiful Lombardia region of Italy.

Scott Running Sport , , , , ,

Saucony ISO-FIT: Improving fit with each step

August 8th, 2014

Saucony ISO-FIT: 2015 Saucony Triumph

For Spring 2015, Saucony is rolling out a premium fit construction for three shoe models in their new ISO-Series. With the goal of reducing points of pressure caused by interaction between the foot and the shoe’s upper, Saucony created ISO-FIT.

ISO-FIT technology virtually eliminates the bunching or creasing in the upper that results from the change in shape of the runner’s foot and shoe during the gait cycle. This should drastically reduce pressure points that cause blisters and other irritation. This is accomplished by what Saucony is calling a “floating support cage,” allowing supportive elements to react independently to foot movements rather than being influenced by other movements of the upper. In addition to the “floating support cage,” an “ultra-soft inner fit-sleeve,” creates a sock-like wrap around the top and sides of the foot.

So what does all this mean? Well, we had a chance to try on the new Saucony Triumph, and the initial step-in feel was very plush and while we cannot yet comment on how it feels on a long run, if the Saucony data is correct, long-term comfort should be outstanding. Look for ISO-FIT this November with the release of the new Triumph. The ISO-series Hurricane will hit the market January 2015 and a new shoe, the Zealot will follow in February.

Jonathan Running Shoes , , ,

Week in Review: July 27-August 2

August 2nd, 2014

Molly Huddle Running to the win

Molly Huddle Continued Her Winning Ways with the USA 7 Mile Title. (Image: Quad City Times)

USA 7 Mile Championships takes over Davenport, Iowa

The Quad City Times Bix 7 is one of many gems on the USA road-racing calendar each year. The race, named for jazz musician and Davenport, Iowa local, Bix Beiderbecke, is the largest non-marathon race in the Midwest each year. It has a list of past champions that reads like a road running hall of fame, with names like Bill Rodgers, Joan Benoit Samulson, and Khalid Khannouchi. The race typically fields a star-studded international cast but in some years it plays host to USA championship races, which have seen winners like Meb Kelfezighi and Ryan Hall. This year was an American only year, as it again hosted the USA 7 mile championships. Each champion brings home a shiny new trumpet as his or her trophy in honor of the race’s namesake.

Coming into the race, the two athletes that dominated the headlines were this year’s Boston winner and former Bix champion Meb, and Molly Huddle. Huddle, another former Bix champion, is fresh off her American record 5000m in Monaco. Molly certainly lived up to the pre-race hype as she took the lead from the gun and never looked back, winning by over a minute. Meb was not quite as triumphant as some hamstring troubles took him out of the race at mile 5 after leading the early miles. Sean Quigley won the race in a kick after numerous runners shared time in the lead.

Commonwealth Games shows off some former NCAA stars

As we mentioned in our Commonwealth games preview blog: Glasgow, Scotland played host to most of the English-speaking world’s best athletes outside of Americans. While Americans don’t participate in the Commonwealth games, there was a good representation of former NCAA athletes that have adopted America as their training home at some point in their lives.

UTEP’s Blessing Okagbare set the Commonwealth Games record in the 100m and won the 200m while representing her home country of Nigeria. University of Oregon alumni Brianne Theison Eaton, wife of decathlon world record holder Ashton Eaton, won a gold medal in the heptathlon for her home country of Canada.  Southern Utah’s Cam Levins got himself a bronze medal in the 10,000m for Canada, While Stephen Chemlany of Iona and Kenya won silver in the Marathon. Shane Brathwaite of Barbados and Texas Tech won bronze in the 110 hurdles, and others surely represented American universities as well as their home country in virtually every event in the competition.

The success of these athletes truly speaks to the NCAA’s ability to develop star track and field athletes. Considering that the vast majority of athletes in the NCAA are American yet the Commonwealth games doesn’t feature them, makes the success of the American system admirable worldwide.

Ethiopian Athletes leave IAAF World Junior Championships Facility, Seeking USA Asylum

Many of the world’s greatest track athletes unfortunately come from some unstable regions in the world. Ethiopia in particular has seen more than its fair share of turmoil in recent memory. With political tensions coming from Egypt over large damming projects on headwaters of the Nile River, the ever-anxious border with Eritrea, formerly part of Ethiopia, as well as porous borders with similarly volatile countries: Eritrea, Sudan, South Sudan, and Somalia. Ethiopia is right at the cross-roads of many unsavory situations.

With that in mind, one could hardly blame four young Ethiopian athletes from seeking a better life in their escape from the IAAF World Junior Championships that concluded last weekend in Eugene, Oregon. Amanuel Abebe Atibeha, Dureti Edao, Meaza Kebede, and Zeytituna Mohammed left the athletes village on the University of Oregon campus in a sedan headed for Portland last Friday. They have been found by police and are confirmed to be safe and unharmed. Political asylum is a long hard process and these young athletes have a tough road ahead of them whether it is in Oregon or in Ethiopia.

This is not the first time that runners have used their talents to escape their countries’ unrest. Following the 2008 World Cross Country Championships in Edinburgh Scotland, a group of Eritrean runners never boarded their flight home and have lived in Scotland ever since. Their escape of landmines and civil war has resulted in minimum wage jobs and a cold apartment in Glasgow. This story particularly hits home here because Tewoldeberhan Mengisteab, the oldest of the athletes finished 52nd in those championships… I finished 51st in the same race and we recorded exactly the same time. We are the same age, have a similar skill set, but hardly share similar paths in life. Stories like this certainly add a bit of perspective to the lives we live.

Scott Running Sport , , , ,

Runner vs Nature: Poison Oak and Ivy

August 1st, 2014

You have been warned! (Photo: My Own 100 Hikes blog)

Running Warehouse’s home is a truly beautiful place to be a runner. San Luis Obispo County is full of open space covered in countless miles of trails. Within the immediate area one can run on the beach or up to 3000 feet of elevation within a 15 minute of drive from this office. We are truly blessed, but every blessing comes with a curse, and our curse is poison oak. The scarlet letter of our trail running faithful shows itself every spring and reappears far too frequently throughout the summer.

Read more…

Scott Running Sport , , , ,

Eugene Hosts World Junior Track and Field Championships

July 30th, 2014
Run, Jump, Throw

Morgan Lake became very familiar with Hayward field as she won the Heptathlon and High Jump. (image: British Athletics)

In most years, the track world would be centrally focused on a world championships or Olympics right now. However, with world championships held on odd years and Olympics in their own quadrennial cycle, there is a gap every four years from these popular events. This allows several smaller championships to shine through during this period and different story lines appear to fill the gap.

The World Junior Track and Field Championships took place this past weekend in Eugene, Oregon and many of the world’s best young track athletes made history. It was the first world championship held in the United States since the World Cross Country Championships occurred in Boston in 1992. With the full spectrum of events held over 6 days of competition, there are far too many stories to cover in just one article. But with many young stars turning out performances that rival their much older peers on the open circuit, the meet certainly deserves mention.

Read more…

Scott Running Sport , , , ,

Common Wealth Games take over Glasgow

July 24th, 2014
Commonwealth games now running

The opening ceremony of the Commonwealth games began with a bang yesterday (Image: Getty)

While the sun may have set a while ago on the British Empire, much of the pomp and circumstances of the time endures to date. The Commonwealth Games, especially for sports fans, are the epitome of those traditions. Glasgow, Scotland plays host to this year’s edition of the quadrennial sports festival that mirrors the Olympics, albeit in a smaller scale for most of the English-speaking world outside of the United States.

Many of the world’s greatest track athletes are invited, making the event a significant fixture on the track calendar. With countries like Jamaica, Kenya, Australia, New Zealand, and India being represented, the competition is sure to be intense. Of course, the United Kingdom will also bring their best athletes to Glasgow as well. However, in this competition they represent their home nations of England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales instead of wearing the Union Jack.

While the withdrawal of Mo Farah is a big blow to the event, there is still enough great talent in the mix to create legacies and introduce new heroes. The most prominent name on the marquee is surely Usain Bolt, but he is only committed to Jamaica’s 4 X 100m relay team. Other prominent stories include Kenyan David Rudisha, world record holder in the 800, continuing his comeback from injury. New Zealand’s Valerie Adams is continuing her unprecedented winning streak in the shot put, and Englishman Greg Rutherford is hoping to add a matching Commonwealth medal to his Olympic gold in the long jump.

Rudisha Running World Record

David Rudisha has high hopes this year after recovering from a knee injury (photo: AP)

The Opening Ceremonies occurred yesterday and featured Rod Stewart belting out his hits and Scottish terriers leading each country in the parade. Also, during the opening ceremonies, £3.1 was raised for the charity Unicef to help children world wide with some of the participating countries being some of the neediest. While athletes don’t take to the track until Sunday, competition has started in earnest today with swimming, track cycling, gymnastics and many other sports already handing out medals. England’s Brownlee brothers, Alistair and Jonny did do some running today to win gold and silver (respectively) in the triathlon while Jodie Stimpson won for England on the women’s side.

The Commonwealth of Nations is, at best, a rough alliance of countries that share some language, culture, and an increasingly distant history under one monarchy (many times an unsavory history at that). The ability of the countries to come together and celebrate many of their greatest athletes is worthy of notice. Athletes like Bolt and Rudisha, choosing to travel to Glasgow and represent their countries instead of saving their legs for more lucrative meets in the months to come, is a testament to the games and their prestigious history.

Scott Running Sport , , , ,

The Badwater Run carries on without the Badwater

July 23rd, 2014
Badwater Run Champion

Harvey Lewis, victor of the race and the terrain. (Photo: Chris Kostman, Instagram)

The Badwater Ultra Marathon, dubbed “the most difficult run in the world”, was won by Harvey Lewis in a time of 23:52:55. Lewis, a teacher at the Cincinnati School for Creative and Performing Arts, covered the 135 miles of California high desert over 50 minutes quicker than his nearest competitor, Grant Maughan of Australia. Alyson Venti, an Oceanography Ph.D. student from University of Miami won the women’s race in 28:37:28.

The course, famous for traveling from the lowest point in North America, Badwater, to the trailhead of the highest mountain in the contiguous United States, Mount Whitney, changed drastically this year due to permitting issues within Death Valley National Park. Over 30 years of safe  and successful events were held in the park by Badwater’s parent company AdventureCORPS. They also host an equally crazy 508 mile bike race from the California coast into Death Valley. The Park suspended all event permits to conduct a safety audit, forcing the Badwater run to start somewhere other than Badwater or be cancelled.

Read more…

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