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Archive for the ‘Running Sport’ Category

7 Reasons Why I’m a Morning Runner

January 12th, 2015

“Why, oh why, do you run that early in the morning?!”

Image from www.fastcory.com

This is a common question that I find myself faced with after admitting that I log my miles before the sun comes up. There are arguments to be made for running early or late, but I happen to be a person that is well suited for early morning runs. Here are the main reasons for my devotion to hitting the pavement in the A.M.

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Food as Fuel: Recipes for the Runner

January 9th, 2015

image: wallpaperscastle.com

My dear friend’s wise father once said, “Food is fuel – nothing more.” I love the idea of his theory, and while experiencing many a post-dessert sugar-hangover, I may have wished that I could live by that simple mantra. But it just will not happen for me. Why? Although I wholeheartedly agree with the first half of the statement, the “nothing more” phrase just will not fly with my indulgent taste buds.

As runners, it is true that food is fuel. We need food to sustain and empower the activity that we love. But to many of us, food is also enjoyment, entertainment, and a social activity. Additionally, food is something that must be practical and fit between running, working, sleeping, family time, and personal time. Can all of the worlds – fuel, gratification and practicality – be merged?  That is what this blog series is about. We recognize that every runner is different. Some clock enough miles to merit constant hunger, and therefore need healthy, hearty, high calorie meals. Some people run to stay fit and lean, and prefer meals on the lighter side. Some people run so that they can eat anything they want – including (but not limited to) large bowls of ice cream with an entire pack of Oreos on the side.

As we share our favorite recipes with you, we hope to provide options for all types of runners and lifestyles. With every recipe we contribute, you’ll be informed as to why we chose it and our opinion on its practical purpose. And hopefully you’ll walk away with one more meal in your recipe book.

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5 Reasons to Start Running (and Continue Running)

January 1st, 2015

It almost goes without saying that it is socially expected for you to create a New Year’s resolution. Of course, there are always the cynics who pledge to eat more Cheetos and play more video games than the previous year. Some even take their apathy towards resolutions to a semi-sincere level by devoting the new year to avoiding road rage, accurately reporting their taxes and tipping better at their local coffee shops. But for every cynic, there is an avid proselytizer that can’t wait to let the whole world know about their resolution. However committed one is to this social phenomena of New Year’s resolutions, eventually the rubber meets the road and one must put their money where their mouth is. Enough idioms? It is better to light a candle than curse the darkness. Chew on that.

Many people turn their resolution efforts towards exercise because they know that inherently, exercise is good for you. Of the long list of exercise methods, running is among the most popular choice. It is a great way to become healthier, happier and help anyone who watched their last pair of pants slowly turn into skinny jeans, make their way back to their desired physique. So, if you find yourself in the camp of resolving to run more in 2015, here are 5 reasons why your new commitment is a great choice. If you are already a dedicated runner, we hope this provides you with some additional ammunition for your next soap box speech to your non-running friends.

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2015 Resolutions: To Keep or Not To Keep?

December 31st, 2014

It has been said that an examination of history serves as a map by which one can see the patterns of the future. And I don’t know about you, but I would be a much happier human being if I knew what “patterns” my New Year’s Resolutions would follow for the next 12 months. For example, I would prefer to know now rather than in September if I will actually go to graduate school, bake all 14 variations of cheesecake in my recipe queue, and keep the rust off of my backpacking gear.

So, I deduced that it would be in my best interest to look at the “’15” years of the last three centuries in order to to get a glimpse of what my future may hold. What has humanity been able to accomplish in 1915, 1815, 1715? Here are a few highlights:

1915: The neon tube light (think NYC and Vegas) was patented, Alexander Graham Bell made the first transcontinental phone call from New York to San Francisco, and Edouarde Fabre won the Boston Marathon in 2:31:41.2.

1815: The world’s first commercial cheese factory was established in Switzerland (my personal favorite), and natural gas was discovered in the U.S.

1715: The total eclipse solar phenomenon was observed for the first time, and the French invented the folding umbrella.

My hypothesis? Several things. First, big things can happen in a year. Secondly, those big things could impact your life, and others, for years to come. And thirdly, the accomplishments above show us that successful endeavors have similar characteristics, themes, and disciplines that allow them to be achieved and sustained. Here are five filters that I will be running my 2015 goals through, and that we believe will assist you in choosing quality resolutions yourself.

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Runner vs. Nature: Mountains

December 23rd, 2014

If you’re a regular on our blog, you are well aware that a runner vs. nature post means that we will be offering helpful tips about how runners can best interact with some form of wildlife or force of nature. Sometimes our interactions are precarious and other times they are awe-inspiring, but they are always memorable because we as humans are intrinsically partnered with the world around us.

For this particular post, I’ve decided to draw inspiration and advice about Mother Nature from Mother Nature. My source? The mountain goat. This valiant, stately mammal can accomplish things on the face of a mountain that humans could only dream of doing. Scaling up, and descending down, steep and rocky terrain, surviving with ease at staggering altitudes, and leaping up to 12 feet in a single bound are abilities that would make our lives much simpler (and way more fun!). But alas, we are not the mountain goat. Our response? We humbly acknowledge our limitations, and press on into the challenges it presents. The mountain goat has adapted and thrived in its natural habitat. While humans have also learned how to survive the dangers of mountain running, it has been a long road of discovery. Follow us as we take a look at the majestic mountain and (hopefully) find something useful to take with you on your next run.

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Finish Line Friday: Strength

October 17th, 2014

Our goal is to help inspire you to keep going, train harder, dig a little deeper and cross the finish line. For this week’s Finish Line Friday, Kaitlin will be sharing her personal sources of inspiration.

Kaitlin

Current Position: Customer Service Representative

Running Background:
It all started in 1986 in Texas….kidding! I was born in Texas, but I grew up in California with my Mom in the Bay Area. I started competing pretty young, with “track” in elementary school. They gave out “Best in Show” ribbons. It was a very small public school. It sparked my interest and I grew to love running as I got older. I ran Track & Field in Middle School and High School, but not consistently. I still enjoyed running, but I focused more on Softball while in High School.

My Freshman year at San Francisco State, I was a walk-on for the Women’s Track Team, competing in the 100 and 200 meter events. I competed for 3 years and then joined a local club team for my Senior and Super Senior year of undergraduate studies. I eventually got into longer distances and participated in some coaching as well as leading Run Club.

What inspires you?

Kaitlin at the Giants Race

Kaitlin finished in 46.50 for 10k at the Giants' Race in September, 2014.

I don’t have a specific quote, but often times, I run through my head the mantra of “strength.” When a race or workout is really tough and I think about slowing down, I will usually push myself to finish the last mile or hill strong. What usually motivates me during training is picturing myself running people down in past or future races.

I do not have a hero in the running world, however my mother has always been a great support in my life and one of the strongest people I will ever know. She has always encouraged me to be self-sufficient and to try and be the best person that I can be, within my running career and in all aspects of my life.

What are you training for now, and what do you refuel with post workout?

I am not currently training for anything right now. I am trying to finish my Masters degree and my schedule has been limited. While I run frequently throughout the week, I haven’t really picked up my mileage, but I am hoping to do so in November. However, I did race in City to Sea and I plan on running the Montana De Oro 25k in January. My favorite post-race recovery is beer and cheese burgers. I generally can’t do that throughout the week, so post-workout, I will go for some chocolate milk or Clif Shot Recovery Drink.

Thanks, Kaitlin!

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The Chicago Marathon: A Showdown of Distance Running Titans

October 14th, 2014

Rita Jeptoo won her 4th marathon in a row at Chicago. Photo: Boston Globe

The World Marathon Majors’ penultimate race occurred Sunday in Chicago and, sticking with tradition, finishing times were fast and the competition was fierce. Some of the world’s best runners joined the crowd of 45,000 participants for the annual 26.2 mile journey through downtown Chicago.

As we reported previously in our World Marathon Major preview, the main story behind this year’s Bank of America Chicago Marathon was the showdown between former Olympic track stars Kenenisa Bekele and Eliud Kipchoge. With over a decade of competition against one another on ovals around the world, seeing the two running 26.2 miles on city streets certainly warranted the attention.

Eliud Kipchoge

Eliud Kipchoge defeats his rival Bekele. Photo: ESPN

As in many of the Bekele vs. Kipchoge showdowns of the past, the majority of the race was run with the two tightly bunched up among some of the world’s other great runners. In this case, Sammy Kitwara and Dickson Chumba joined Kenenisa and Eliud for the first 20 miles at 2:04 marathon pace. While Dennis Kimetto’s world record may have been out of reach at that point, Bekele’s past heroics led one to believe that with a fast finish, the course record could still be in jeopardy. However, Bekele’s near invincibility on the track did not transfer over to the road this time and Kipchoge ended up getting the better of his rival, finishing at 2:04:11 in winning time. Kitwara and Chumba also got the better of Bekele with their finishing times of 2:04:28 and 2:04:32 respectively. Chumba’s time was the best third place finishing time ever in a marathon. Bekele held on for fourth place and his second sub 2:06 with a time of 2:05:51.

While most of the media’s attention was given the men’s race, the women’s group had its star power on display as well. Rita Jeptoo came to Chicago with a target on her back and still dominated the event. Her defense of last year’s title was her fourth Marathon Major win in a row, a streak few have ever achieved, and secured her the World Marathon Major title and the $500,000 prize (on top of the $100,000 purse she earned by winning the race). While her time of 2:24:35 is significantly slower than her personal best of 2:18:57 (Boston Marathon, 2014), she showed that she could stay dominant no matter what the racing style is. Her previous wins came in fast races, and to maintain her composure in a tactical race and finish a minute ahead of the rest of the pack shows that has the potential to keep this streak going for a while.

The final stop on the World Marathon Major tour is the TCS New York City Marathon on November 2, 2014. Dennis Kimetto may have taken the World Record from Wilson Kipsang, but a win in New York would assure Kipsang the World Marathon Major title, surely $500,000 is a nice silver lining after losing the record.

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The Running Jargon Cheat Sheet

October 6th, 2014

We’ve all been there. New to the running world and embracing it with open arms… and ears. You try to socialize with a seasoned pro, but as soon as a “fartlek workout” comes up, or perhaps “bonking”, you just nod your head and secretly look up these terms on your carefully hidden iPhone. Runnerspeak can be flat out disconcerting when you’re not hip to the vocab.

Runners have a language of their own, and sometimes it just doesn’t cut it to Google (or Bing!) the word… a dictionary doesn’t often provide great context. Oh, and please don’t use Urban Dictionary. Trust me on this one.

Image via quickmeme

So, for those of you who may need a little “cheat sheet”, or maybe just a quick refresher course on running jargon, check out this short list of 10 words that we’ve compiled.

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Finish Line Friday: Because I Can

October 3rd, 2014

As you probably know, the staff here at Running Warehouse consists largely of runners. We range from recreational runners, who use running as a tool by which to get (and stay) fit to Olympic qualifying competitive runners who are always looking for their next PR. It’s a beautiful spectrum.

Every other Friday, I’m asking one member of our staff: What drives you? What motivates you to be the best runner you can be? What keeps you going when you feel like calling it a day? What gets you to the finish line? Our goal is to help inspire you to keep going, train harder, dig a little deeper and cross the finish line.

Today, Tera will be sharing her personal sources of inspiration.

Tera

Current Position: Retail Manager

Running background:
I began running in middle school doing track in the spring. In high school, I ran on the XC and track team for Campolindo in Moraga, CA. Got a bit burned out after high school and decided to take college off. I did, however, get motivated to jump into the occasional 5k/10k during that time. Post college, I ended up being an assistant coach for a few years and became more and more motivated to run competitively again. Did my first 1/2 marathon at (I think) age 24 and first marathon at 26.

After meeting Erik (who is now my husband) and he was doing ultras, I figured a 50k wouldn’t be much different than a marathon and seemed much more enjoyable on the trails. So I did my first 50k shortly after being married, at the age of 29. After that, I was hooked! I had found my calling and much preferred the trails over the roads and the overall community of the ultra world. Though there is something about running fast and getting a personal best that still has me coming back. The year after I ran my first 100 miler (with my first daughter in utero!) I set a PR in the marathon 2:59 at CIM. Since then, I PR’d again with a 2:57 at the age of 39 (I think and that was after having daughter #2).

Tera and Dusty at the Western States 100 miler, June 2014

What inspires you?
Well, a lot has to do with just pushing myself to see what I’m capable of and not being complacent or settling for less than what I think I’m capable of. I do look up to women that are in their 50’s and still kicking butt, like Meghan Arbogast (ultra runner) and local, Linda Somers Smith. I feel fortunate that I can pull from a ton of inspiration. Here are just a few: I have a father with Parkinson’s, I lost a really good running buddy this year who also happened to be my pacer at Western States in June, I have two really awesome daughters, a great job with great people, a bunch of running partners that are willing to run with me at all times of the day/night, and a supportive husband that constantly keeps me focused and grounded.

All these things, and many more, are what I think about when the going gets tough. If I can’t put one foot in front of the other to just cross a finish line, then I feel like I’m not only letting myself down, but all those people in my life, or those that are no longer here. It’s not just a personal accomplishment, but a whole lot of support from so many people that goes into it. If I can’t make it to the finish line, it’s going to be because I am physically unable, not for a lack of determination.

One silly motivational quote I’ve used lately is “the faster you run, the sooner you’re done”. It works and it’s really true. When you are running 100 miles, it’s really hard to keep the negative thoughts out of your head. It’s pretty much impossible. I usually question why I’m doing this a million times. It’s a really simple answer though, I do it because I can. I’m just fortunate that way I suppose.

Tera Dube

Tera atop Cuesta grade while training

What are you training for now, and what do you refuel with post workout?
My next 100 miler. I’m extremely motivated to master the 100’s, even if it puts me in my grave, ha ha. I know I have more to contribute to this distance and I’m not willing to give up yet. After almost every run I do, I use FLUID recovery (chocolate) with half a frozen banana and rice milk.

Thanks Tera!

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Dennis Kimetto Creates History in the Marathon

October 1st, 2014

Kimetto on the podium with his official record time. Photo: The Telegraph

For the fourth time in six years, the men’s marathon world record has a new owner. Dennis Kimetto followed in the footsteps of the phenomenal athletes before him by blazing through the streets of Berlin and into uncharted territory. While recent trends might indicate that his hold on the record may only be temporary, his time of 2:02:57 gives him the right to claim first under the 2:03 barrier for eternity. Dennis wasn’t the only runner that came prepared for the record assault as second place finisher Emmanuel Mutai also surpassed the previous world record, finishing in 2:03:13.

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