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Finish Line Friday: Strength

October 17th, 2014

Our goal is to help inspire you to keep going, train harder, dig a little deeper and cross the finish line. For this week’s Finish Line Friday, Kaitlin will be sharing her personal sources of inspiration.

Kaitlin

Current Position: Customer Service Representative

Running Background:
It all started in 1986 in Texas….kidding! I was born in Texas, but I grew up in California with my Mom in the Bay Area. I started competing pretty young, with “track” in elementary school. They gave out “Best in Show” ribbons. It was a very small public school. It sparked my interest and I grew to love running as I got older. I ran Track & Field in Middle School and High School, but not consistently. I still enjoyed running, but I focused more on Softball while in High School.

My Freshman year at San Francisco State, I was a walk-on for the Women’s Track Team, competing in the 100 and 200 meter events. I competed for 3 years and then joined a local club team for my Senior and Super Senior year of undergraduate studies. I eventually got into longer distances and participated in some coaching as well as leading Run Club.

What inspires you?

Kaitlin at the Giants Race

Kaitlin finished in 46.50 for 10k at the Giants' Race in September, 2014.

I don’t have a specific quote, but often times, I run through my head the mantra of “strength.” When a race or workout is really tough and I think about slowing down, I will usually push myself to finish the last mile or hill strong. What usually motivates me during training is picturing myself running people down in past or future races.

I do not have a hero in the running world, however my mother has always been a great support in my life and one of the strongest people I will ever know. She has always encouraged me to be self-sufficient and to try and be the best person that I can be, within my running career and in all aspects of my life.

What are you training for now, and what do you refuel with post workout?

I am not currently training for anything right now. I am trying to finish my Masters degree and my schedule has been limited. While I run frequently throughout the week, I haven’t really picked up my mileage, but I am hoping to do so in November. However, I did race in City to Sea and I plan on running the Montana De Oro 25k in January. My favorite post-race recovery is beer and cheese burgers. I generally can’t do that throughout the week, so post-workout, I will go for some chocolate milk or Clif Shot Recovery Drink.

Thanks, Kaitlin!

Rachel Running Sport, Women's Running , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Chicago Marathon: A Showdown of Distance Running Titans

October 14th, 2014

Rita Jeptoo won her 4th marathon in a row at Chicago. Photo: Boston Globe

The World Marathon Majors’ penultimate race occurred Sunday in Chicago and, sticking with tradition, finishing times were fast and the competition was fierce. Some of the world’s best runners joined the crowd of 45,000 participants for the annual 26.2 mile journey through downtown Chicago.

As we reported previously in our World Marathon Major preview, the main story behind this year’s Bank of America Chicago Marathon was the showdown between former Olympic track stars Kenenisa Bekele and Eliud Kipchoge. With over a decade of competition against one another on ovals around the world, seeing the two running 26.2 miles on city streets certainly warranted the attention.

Eliud Kipchoge

Eliud Kipchoge defeats his rival Bekele. Photo: ESPN

As in many of the Bekele vs. Kipchoge showdowns of the past, the majority of the race was run with the two tightly bunched up among some of the world’s other great runners. In this case, Sammy Kitwara and Dickson Chumba joined Kenenisa and Eliud for the first 20 miles at 2:04 marathon pace. While Dennis Kimetto’s world record may have been out of reach at that point, Bekele’s past heroics led one to believe that with a fast finish, the course record could still be in jeopardy. However, Bekele’s near invincibility on the track did not transfer over to the road this time and Kipchoge ended up getting the better of his rival, finishing at 2:04:11 in winning time. Kitwara and Chumba also got the better of Bekele with their finishing times of 2:04:28 and 2:04:32 respectively. Chumba’s time was the best third place finishing time ever in a marathon. Bekele held on for fourth place and his second sub 2:06 with a time of 2:05:51.

While most of the media’s attention was given the men’s race, the women’s group had its star power on display as well. Rita Jeptoo came to Chicago with a target on her back and still dominated the event. Her defense of last year’s title was her fourth Marathon Major win in a row, a streak few have ever achieved, and secured her the World Marathon Major title and the $500,000 prize (on top of the $100,000 purse she earned by winning the race). While her time of 2:24:35 is significantly slower than her personal best of 2:18:57 (Boston Marathon, 2014), she showed that she could stay dominant no matter what the racing style is. Her previous wins came in fast races, and to maintain her composure in a tactical race and finish a minute ahead of the rest of the pack shows that has the potential to keep this streak going for a while.

The final stop on the World Marathon Major tour is the TCS New York City Marathon on November 2, 2014. Dennis Kimetto may have taken the World Record from Wilson Kipsang, but a win in New York would assure Kipsang the World Marathon Major title, surely $500,000 is a nice silver lining after losing the record.

Scott Running News, Running Sport , , , , ,

The Running Jargon Cheat Sheet

October 6th, 2014

We’ve all been there. New to the running world and embracing it with open arms… and ears. You try to socialize with a seasoned pro, but as soon as a “fartlek workout” comes up, or perhaps “bonking”, you just nod your head and secretly look up these terms on your carefully hidden iPhone. Runnerspeak can be flat out disconcerting when you’re not hip to the vocab.

Runners have a language of their own, and sometimes it just doesn’t cut it to Google (or Bing!) the word… a dictionary doesn’t often provide great context. Oh, and please don’t use Urban Dictionary. Trust me on this one.

Image via quickmeme

So, for those of you who may need a little “cheat sheet”, or maybe just a quick refresher course on running jargon, check out this short list of 10 words that we’ve compiled.

Read more…

Rachel Running Sport , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Finish Line Friday: Because I Can

October 3rd, 2014

As you probably know, the staff here at Running Warehouse consists largely of runners. We range from recreational runners, who use running as a tool by which to get (and stay) fit to Olympic qualifying competitive runners who are always looking for their next PR. It’s a beautiful spectrum.

Every other Friday, I’m asking one member of our staff: What drives you? What motivates you to be the best runner you can be? What keeps you going when you feel like calling it a day? What gets you to the finish line? Our goal is to help inspire you to keep going, train harder, dig a little deeper and cross the finish line.

Today, Tera will be sharing her personal sources of inspiration.

Tera

Current Position: Retail Manager

Running background:
I began running in middle school doing track in the spring. In high school, I ran on the XC and track team for Campolindo in Moraga, CA. Got a bit burned out after high school and decided to take college off. I did, however, get motivated to jump into the occasional 5k/10k during that time. Post college, I ended up being an assistant coach for a few years and became more and more motivated to run competitively again. Did my first 1/2 marathon at (I think) age 24 and first marathon at 26.

After meeting Erik (who is now my husband) and he was doing ultras, I figured a 50k wouldn’t be much different than a marathon and seemed much more enjoyable on the trails. So I did my first 50k shortly after being married, at the age of 29. After that, I was hooked! I had found my calling and much preferred the trails over the roads and the overall community of the ultra world. Though there is something about running fast and getting a personal best that still has me coming back. The year after I ran my first 100 miler (with my first daughter in utero!) I set a PR in the marathon 2:59 at CIM. Since then, I PR’d again with a 2:57 at the age of 39 (I think and that was after having daughter #2).

Tera and Dusty at the Western States 100 miler, June 2014

What inspires you?
Well, a lot has to do with just pushing myself to see what I’m capable of and not being complacent or settling for less than what I think I’m capable of. I do look up to women that are in their 50′s and still kicking butt, like Meghan Arbogast (ultra runner) and local, Linda Somers Smith. I feel fortunate that I can pull from a ton of inspiration. Here are just a few: I have a father with Parkinson’s, I lost a really good running buddy this year who also happened to be my pacer at Western States in June, I have two really awesome daughters, a great job with great people, a bunch of running partners that are willing to run with me at all times of the day/night, and a supportive husband that constantly keeps me focused and grounded.

All these things, and many more, are what I think about when the going gets tough. If I can’t put one foot in front of the other to just cross a finish line, then I feel like I’m not only letting myself down, but all those people in my life, or those that are no longer here. It’s not just a personal accomplishment, but a whole lot of support from so many people that goes into it. If I can’t make it to the finish line, it’s going to be because I am physically unable, not for a lack of determination.

One silly motivational quote I’ve used lately is “the faster you run, the sooner you’re done”. It works and it’s really true. When you are running 100 miles, it’s really hard to keep the negative thoughts out of your head. It’s pretty much impossible. I usually question why I’m doing this a million times. It’s a really simple answer though, I do it because I can. I’m just fortunate that way I suppose.

Tera Dube

Tera atop Cuesta grade while training

What are you training for now, and what do you refuel with post workout?
My next 100 miler. I’m extremely motivated to master the 100′s, even if it puts me in my grave, ha ha. I know I have more to contribute to this distance and I’m not willing to give up yet. After almost every run I do, I use FLUID recovery (chocolate) with half a frozen banana and rice milk.

Thanks Tera!

Rachel Running Sport, Women's Running , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Dennis Kimetto Creates History in the Marathon

October 1st, 2014

Kimetto on the podium with his official record time. Photo: The Telegraph

For the fourth time in six years, the men’s marathon world record has a new owner. Dennis Kimetto followed in the footsteps of the phenomenal athletes before him by blazing through the streets of Berlin and into uncharted territory. While recent trends might indicate that his hold on the record may only be temporary, his time of 2:02:57 gives him the right to claim first under the 2:03 barrier for eternity. Dennis wasn’t the only runner that came prepared for the record assault as second place finisher Emmanuel Mutai also surpassed the previous world record, finishing in 2:03:13.

Read more…

Scott Running News, Running Sport , , ,

Does Shalane Have What it Takes? A look at American Women’s Marathon Record Holders

September 26th, 2014

Shalane will go for the American marathon record this weekend. How does she stack up with the past record holders? (Image: Olympic Pt)

As mentioned in Running Warehouse’s preview of the coming World Marathon Majors, Shalane Flanagan is waging an assault on Deena Kastor’s American record this Sunday at the Berlin Marathon. Shalane’s resume suggests that she has the talent necessary to attempt the feat, with her 10,000m record and medals at the Olympics and World Cross Country Championships. That said, the marathon record might be Deena’s greatest accomplishment in a spectacular career. Shalane may be the next in line of spectacular women holding the top spot on the list of American marathoners, but it is going to take a truly special performance. Deena reminded us last Sunday of the phenomenal athlete that she is the best way she knows how, by tearing up the roads.

Read more…

Scott Running Sport, Uncategorized

Diamond League Finishes in Style in Brussels

September 5th, 2014

Brenda Martinez Runs Fast

World Champs medalist Brenda Martinez won today but is she even the best American 800m woman? (photo: gobrendamartinez.com)

With the Diamond League season coming to a close today, the track season is effectively over. Sure, there is the Continental Cup serving as the true end to the season, but after the exhausting season and most of the storylines already written: the Continental Cup serves more to figure out who’s minds and bodies went on vacation early than figuring out who the best athletes are. So, as far as this blog is concerned, the season’s over.

Running Warehouse caught on to some of track and field’s great narratives early and today’s meet served as a fitting end to some of them. Nothing feels better than a good “I told you so,” and that is exactly what I’m going to do with this blog.

Most recently we told you that the American middle distance running crew are the best in the world and Brenda Martinez’s 800m win today emphatically confirmed that. She ran a blazing 1:58.84 and showed the world that she is still a force to be reckoned with after a disappointing USA Championships and a midseason break to regroup. This means that no less than 3 Americans look like they could be next year’s women’s 800m World Champion and several more Americans aren’t far behind. With our previously mentioned success in the 1500, it is an exciting time for our middle distance fans out there.

Jager Runs over Barriers

Evan Jager broke his own American steeplechase record today.

Back in July, we told you that there is a pair of great steeplechasers representing the United States with fast times and beautiful hair. Admittedly, I wrote the blog about Emma and Evan in anticipation of Evan breaking the American steeplechase record in Monaco and had to make some alterations after he missed the mark. Well, earlier today he did break his American record with a third place finish in the event. This year of fearlessly chasing the best in the world over the barriers is hopefully a perfect juncture to next year’s World Championships and the 2016 Olympics, as he is still so new to the event.

Christian runs and jumps

Christian Taylor is Superman.

Our final story started way back at the beginning of the season but a picture in one of our “week in running” blogs didn’t do Christian Taylor justice. Christian is one of the greatest athletes on the planet, who proves time and time again, that he can do almost anything he wants with his legs. The triple jump gold medalist defended his hop, skip, and jump territory last week by winning the Diamond League title and went after the long jump title today. Beginning the season with a spot on the world’s best 4 X 400 meter team at the World Relays and ending the season with Diamond League titles at both horizontal jumps would have been truly super-human. As it turns out, he is human and had to settle for 3rd in today’s long jump and the Diamond Chase. He is certainly still an amazing athlete to follow and it will be interesting to see which event he chooses to conquer next.

With the track season ending, our focus will turn to the major fall marathons and the races leading up to them. The Berlin Marathon is at the end of the month and world records are always at risk when that gun goes off. This weekend’s Great North Run will serve as a great appetizer for marathon fans as Mo Farah takes on Olympic bronze medalist Tariku Bekele and one of the fastest half marathon courses anywhere. There will be plenty of great races to come while we wait for tracks to heat up again next year.

Scott Running Sport , , , , , ,

American Women Own the Middle Distances for 2014

August 28th, 2014
Jenny Wilson New Balance Running

Jenny Simpson capped off her historic year today by winning the Diamond League title.

Today’s 1500-meter race at the Zurich Diamond League has tipped the scale for American middle distance women. The ladies in Red White and Blue can justly claim to be the best in the world in the 800-1500 for 2014.

Run Fast Get this sweet trophy

The Diamond League trophy is almost as sweet as the $40,000.

In Switzerland Jenny Simpson dove to the line to earn the win in the Diamond league final by a mere hundredth of a second over countrywoman Shannon Rowbury. This feat earned Jenny the overall Diamond League trophy, the accompanying $40,000, and an automatic entry into next year’s World Championships (meaning Team USA will have 4 women at next years World Championships). The race also adds to an amazing season for Shannon who bettered her personal bests at 1500m and 5000m and broke the American Record in the 2-mile.

Jenny and Shannon are running so well that it is easy to overlook women like Brenda Martinez who notched a solid 4:01.36 season best today. Brenda started the season well by anchoring USA teams to American records and gold and silver medals in the 4 X 800 and 4 X 1500 at the IAAF World Relays but has mostly flown under the radar since.

Equally impressive to the Americans’ success in the women’s 1500m is their American peer’s success in the 800m. Beginning with the indoor season where Chanelle Price won the World Indoor Championships in that event, American women have repeatedly held their own in the two-lap event this year.

800m women run fast

Chanelle Price was the best in the world indoor and Ajee Wilson has shined outdoor.

Chanelle backed her indoor championship up with her second place finish in the Doha Diamond League event and her first ever sub 2-minute performance. Brenda Martinez was the next athlete to perform internationally with her own sub 2 minute 800 to win the Hangelo World Challenge meet in the Netherlands. Laura Roesler finished her dominant final collegiate year with a win at the NCAA championships and a second place at the USA Track and Field Championships. Beating Laura at those championships was the phenomenal 20-year-old Ajee Wilson.

Hindsight shows that Ajee Wilson’s win at the USA championships was only a tune-up for her race at the Monaco Diamond league a few weeks later. In Monaco, Ajee ran a world leading time of 1:57.67 to end Eunice Sum’s 14 win unbeaten streak.

So far there are 6 American women under 2 minutes for the 800 this year, 2 more than the next best country Russia, and there are several other Americans that have run 2:00 or 2:01. With the Diamond League final for the women’s 800m being held next week it will be interesting to see if any American women can mimic the success of Jenny Simpson with a win there. Either way, American success at next week’s 800m in Brussels would only add to the middle distance success that USA has seen this year, but after today, American’s have already done enough to claim dominance for the year.

Scott Running Sport , , , , , , ,

Americans Get Back on Track in Stockholm

August 22nd, 2014

running

Jenny Simpson was one of 6 Americans who won their event in Stockholm.

After over a month of hibernation, Americans hit the track again at yesterday’s Stockholm Diamond League meet. In virtually every event of the meet, we got to see whether our American stars came in rested and ready to go or possibly stale from the time off. How they might fair against the rest of the world, many of whom were coming off of continental championships, added to the intrigue.

All told, USA won 6 of the 16 marquee events contested in the meet. These wins covered the whole range of track and field with Americans victories in the shot put, long jump, 200m, 100m hurdles, 400m hurdles, and 1500m. American women stole the show with four wins while men took the other two.

The shot put victory went to one of the elder statesmen of USA track and field: Reese Hoffa. Reese has been hurling heavy objects around the world for over a decade now and it is wonderful to see the former orphan still winning on some of the worlds biggest stages and continuing to build his legacy.

Tianna Bartoletta proved again that she is an incredible athlete with her win in the long jump. Formerly known as Tianna Madison, she was a world indoor and outdoor champion jumper but recently has seen more success in the 100 meters with her fourth place showing at the Olympics and the lead off leg on the world-record setting 4 X 100m in London. Her win in the long jump proves that she can still be a threat at multiple disciplines. Furthering her athletic resume, she also has international success in the bobsled.

Allyson Felix has been setting tracks around the world on fire since she was a high school student. She got another win in the Stockholm 200m to add to her endless collection and put her in the driver’s seat for the overall diamond league title in that event with the remaining competition.

Queen Harrison led a trio of Americans in the 100m hurdles. The Virginia Tech graduate was the youngest of the American winners in Stockholm and is truly finding her own this year with a big lead in the diamond league chase for the event four years after winning the Bowerman award (Heisman for track) in her senior year of college.

Tinsley Running over Hurdles

Michael Tinsley continues to impress over the hurdles.

Michael Tinsley has been running on the international circuit for a long time now but the late-bloomer hadn’t made a World Championships team until he was selected to run for USA in London in 2012. He made the most of his first global championship with a silver medal in London and clearly isn’t slowing down two years later with this win in Stockholm.

Rounding out the 6 American victors is Jenny Simpson. Furthering the notion that she may never run over steeple barriers again like she did in college at Colorado, she beat a stout field in the 1500m in Stockholm and is proving that her world championship success from Daegu, a race that seemed to come out of nowhere, was no fluke and she is one of the most talented runners in the world.

With these wins and some other solid performances in other events, Americans proved that for the most part, they were more rested than rusty after the break. With three Diamond League events left and then the Continental Cup, that break may pay off for many of our favorites.

Scott Running Sport, Uncategorized , ,

Rob Krar is Becoming a Legend

August 18th, 2014

Rob Krar is at home in the mountains. (image: Denver Post)

Rob Krar is good at running 100-mile races through the mountains. In June, he took the Western States Endurance Run title and this past weekend he won the Leadville Trail 100, running the second fastest time in both races’ history. In conquering the Sierra Nevada and Rocky mountain ranges’ most storied ultra races, Rob has put himself on the map as one of the world’s best runners, something that would have been hard to predict for the former middle distance runner from the banks of Lake Ontario.

Rob has always been good at running. As a young track runner, Krar earned himself a scholarship at Butler University and boasts personal bests of 1:51 and 3:44 in the 800 and 1500 respectively. The Canadian native hardly has the prototypical background of an ultra marathon champion. Following his time at Butler, Rob moved to Phoenix to pursue a career as a pharmacist and mostly gave up competitive running. The city life in Phoenix wasn’t to Rob’s liking and when the opportunity to transfer to Flagstaff came along, Rob made the move.

Many runners have made their way to Flagstaff to log countless miles on the town’s endless mountain trails, but Rob ended up there by a different route. What was to be a short stint in Flagstaff to earn his pharmaceutical certifications, is now going on 8 years with no plans of leaving. Clearly, Rob also started lacing up the running shoes again.

Rob didn’t turn into an overnight champion. After running sparingly between his time at Butler and his arrival in Flagstaff (he graduated from Butler in 2001 and transferred from Phoenix to Flagstaff in 2006), his body had to adjust to training regularly again. It took a year or so before Rob’s running returned to form. At first, he took to the roads and notched personal bests of 2:25 in the marathon and 1:05 in the half marathon. Despite the competitive success, running on pavement took its toll physically and mentally and after extended time off for an injury to his heel that required surgery, he took to the trails in earnest. He has been destroying trail races since, from winning the Sportiva Mountain Cup in 2012 to his Leadville domination this weekend.

If Rob’s victory at Western States showed that Rob has arrived as a true ultra star, his win at Leadville showed that he’s not content to simply bask in his newfound stardom. Krar seems to have a genuine love for the trails and is more intent on covering as many miles as possible than chasing after adoration (Although his signature beard does have its own twitter account @RobKrarsBeard). For Rob, there is no rest for the weary as he is set to run Steamboat Springs’ Run Rabbit Run 100 mile race in less than a month. A win there would make for a truly legendary summer.

Scott Running Sport , , , ,