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The Badwater Run carries on without the Badwater

July 23rd, 2014
Badwater Run Champion

Harvey Lewis, victor of the race and the terrain. (Photo: Chris Kostman, Instagram)

The Badwater Ultra Marathon, dubbed “the most difficult run in the world”, was won by Harvey Lewis in a time of 23:52:55. Lewis, a teacher at the Cincinnati School for Creative and Performing Arts, covered the 135 miles of California high desert over 50 minutes quicker than his nearest competitor, Grant Maughan of Australia. Alyson Venti, an Oceanography Ph.D. student from University of Miami won the women’s race in 28:37:28.

The course, famous for traveling from the lowest point in North America, Badwater, to the trailhead of the highest mountain in the contiguous United States, Mount Whitney, changed drastically this year due to permitting issues within Death Valley National Park. Over 30 years of safe  and successful events were held in the park by Badwater’s parent company AdventureCORPS. They also host an equally crazy 508 mile bike race from the California coast into Death Valley. The Park suspended all event permits to conduct a safety audit, forcing the Badwater run to start somewhere other than Badwater or be cancelled.

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Scott Running Events , , , , ,

Dolomites Skyrunning, Rare Alpine Beauty

July 22nd, 2014

In the span of three weeks, Killian Jornet has repeatedly broken through reality taking on the world’s best athletes on the most spectacular courses seemingly every weekend.

Kilian Jornet is part billy goat

This weekend, a week after winning the Hardrock 100 mile race, he won the Dolomites Skyrace beating Rumanian Ionut Zinca.

Laura Orguè took conquered over 3000m of cumulative climbing to take the women's race.

Laura Orgue moved up in distance from her typical specialty, the vertical kilometer (an event with around 1000 meters of climbing over a variety of distances but typically shorter than 5km). So, Really steep.

The race is unbelievably beautiful

And here are more pictures because they are amazing.

Dolomite running

Running through a cave of snow

And through an alpine meadow

Some moments on the course seem more like rock climbing than running

These photos and more can be found at dolomiteskyrace.com

Scott Running Events , , ,

Emma and Evan Leap over Barriers

July 21st, 2014

Trailed by long blond hair and many of the best steeplechasers in the world, Evan Jager and Emma Coburn have set the standard for Americans. With no big global championships available this year, it is the perfect time for Americans to run all-out with nothing to lose. Our barrier jumping compatriots have taken advantage of the opportunity to build on their legacy, fearless of the world’s best.

While the steeplechase may not garner equivalent attention to some other track events, its unique nature and potential for disaster makes for some loyal fans. When the best from each gender in the country’s history are reaching their peak at the same time, the event is doubly exciting.

Emma Coburn and Evan Jager dominating their discipline.

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Scott Uncategorized

Another Generation of Hardrock Adventure

July 14th, 2014
    “Long distance” is an subjective concept. Long can mean a mile to some while others use marathons as “speed training.” However, the unifying quality of distance running, regardless of the distance, is adventure that accompanies the training, racing, and post race celebrating. You pick your poison, but you are rewarded with a story once you endure.

    With that, the Hardrock 100 Mile Endurance Run may stand-alone in the adventure classification.  Built in the footsteps of Rocky Mountain miners – the hardy exploring archetype of the western genre – this run makes no concessions to the weary. The 100 mile distance is only part of the challenge, with the average elevation atop the tree line of 11,000 feet. Not to mention that runners are exposed to extra weather-related variables without sufficient oxygen to process their plight.

    Katie DeSplinter took this amazing picture of a Hardrocker. (found at hardrock100.com)

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Scott Running Events , , ,

Jack’s Helping Hand

July 10th, 2014

Jack’s Helping Hand is the inspiration behind the Running Warehouse’s Pozo 5k (held every Fourth of July at the historic Pozo Saloon, this year’s race recap can be found here).  While gathering for some holiday morning sweat has its benefits, doing so for Jack’s Helping Hand make the efforts to organize the event each year particularly rewarding.

Jack Ready, like many kids, learned to love watching cartoons and playing games. Unlike most kids, Jack needed assistance to do these things while he also waged a battle with a rare form of brain cancer.

In memory of their son, Paul and Bridget Ready started Jack’s helping hand in an attempt to make sure San Luis Obispo County’s children and their families, who are inflicted with the life’s unexpected circumstances, get the support they need to maintain a semblance of normalcy.

Jack’s Helping Hand helps these families with support from all angles. From support for treatment related equipment, technology, travel and other unique needs to community development and networking between families facing similar difficulties, Jack’s Helping Hand brings hope to those where hope might be otherwise lost.

In Jack's Memory, countless kids and families are helped.

Jack’s Helping Hand has also been instrumental in building an infrastructure within the county to support those with special needs. The organization has developed toy libraries so that families can find special toys for their kids while saving money for other essentials. They have advocated for expanded pediatric cancer treatment within the county so that less children have travel for their treatment. They are in the process of building The Jack Ready Imagination Park, a place for all kids to stay active with play structures, sports fields, and an equestrian center that is accessible to all.

If you are a San Luis Obispo County resident and your family or a family you know of can use Jack’s Helping Hand, applications are here.

If you can help support Jack’s Helping Hand in any way – information is found here.

Scott Uncategorized

Runner vs. Nature: Skunks Stink

July 10th, 2014

Throughout the United States, skunks are hiding in cat-sized crevasses waiting to roam the night (or if you are reading this at night, they are roaming currently). These opportunistic animals are happy hunting insects and small rodents, foraging for berries, scavenging a convenient carcass, or making a mess of your trashcan. Over time, their versatility has allowed them to thrive in virtually every condition and take on urban sprawl with little impact on their population whereas other animals have been less successful at “fitting into society”.

Skunk

Skunks can't be missed (Image: Britannic)

Where most animals use camouflage to blend in, skunks are outsiders. If squirrels listen to Coldplay, skunks listen to Rancid and dress the part. Like our neighborhood punk rock aficionados, standing out is part of their visage and lets the rest of us know that they play by a different set of rules. Where their furry friends scurry to safety at the first sign of danger, skunks are more apt to mosey on brazenly until predators prove they are serious.

Despite their prolific presence in our environment, runner-skunk encounters are rare. Still, if you run enough miles, particularly at dusk or dawn, it is likely that you will see a skunk in your running career. If you get too close, you, and your social life will be immediately impacted.

While other mammals have the ability to create a musky scent for territory marking or mating purposes only skunks have the ability to spray their musk as a projectile. As anyone with experience can attest, their musk is by far the most potent. From glands in the skunk’s rear, the offensive fluid can be sprayed up to 12 feet with a good amount of accuracy.

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Scott Running Sport , , ,

Q&A with Stephanie Nunes: A Look at Gluten-free Diets for Runners

July 3rd, 2014

Stephanie Nunes talks Nutrition

Stephanie Nunes of Rock Solid Nutrition is a San Luis Obispo native and Running Warehouse friend. She is a registered dietitian (RD) with over 15 years of experience and is certified as a Specialist in Sports Dietetics (CSSD) that has helped countless athletes, elite and beginner alike, achieve their goals.

Today she will be answering some nutrition questions that have become popular of late. Particularly, we will be discussing food allergies. Given the ever-expanding gluten-free section at many grocery stores and a strong push by many across the world to see more ingredients listed on restaurant menus, this surely a popular topic at the moment.

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Scott Run Training, Running Sport , , , , ,

Western States Race Recap with Tera Dube

July 1st, 2014

Tera enjoying the beauty of Robinson Flat

Racing is inherently unpredictable. It’s part of its charm. We can spend an eternity preparing for race day but any number of unforeseen factors can derail even the best-laid plans. Mastering the unpredictable is addictive and it is why we runners search ceaselessly for new challenges. It may be new personal records, more competitive fields, and longer distances over the most taxing courses.

This past weekend, Tera Dube, our retail manager and fountain of positive energy that helps this company thrive, reached the epitome of ultra running when she toed the line at the Western States Endurance run. As an automatic qualifier by virtue of  a fourth place finish at the Sean O’Brien 50 miler, she had her eyes on a top 10 finish and a sub 24- hour belt buckle. Her training lined up perfectly and she was confidently prepared for the journey from Squaw Valley to Auburn.

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Scott Running Sport , ,

Western States Endurance Run: 100 Miles of Prestige (and Running)

June 26th, 2014

A 24-hour Completion = Silver Buckle Award. Photo: TNF & Runner's World, 2006

Claiming one’s self as the most prestigious anything is a bold statement. It’s one that comes with the risk of backlash if expectations are left unmet. It generally takes years of experience, as well as talent and ingenuity, to back up such a claim. At that, the Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run, “the worlds oldest and most prestigious 100-mile trail race,” makes the claim unabashedly and accurately.

The race has set the bar for ultra running around the world over its 41 year history. The race started when Gordy Ainsleigh decided to complete the Western States Trail Ride, an event testing the endurance of our equine friends, sans horse. The race has been challenging the limits of runners ever since.

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Scott Running Sport , ,

Elite Oregon Club Teams Take to the Track

June 25th, 2014

Galen Rupp in an OTC uniform (photo: oregonlive.com)

Of late, American distance running is going through a bit of an identity crisis spawned from the fact that the athletes participating seemingly have no identity. When the best track athletes graduate from college and sign endorsement contracts, they join a team that in many cases spans the globe. While an endorsement deal is a momentous time for both brand and athlete, it is also a great feeling to be a part of something larger than one’s self. It is difficult for fans to grapple with these teams in the same way that they root for their favorite basketball team or university. At the same time, runners have always come together in training groups centered around coaches, but with endorsement deals taking precedence, they haven’t branded themselves as unique.

However, that started to change a little bit when Vin Lananna took over as the University of Oregon Track coach and dragged Frank Gagliano (later replaced by Mark Rowland) to Eugene to revive the Oregon Track Club. The Oregon Track Club has a tremendously successful history and its revival as an elite program was an integral complement to the community Lanana was trying to foster. This brought a wave of quality athletes to Eugene to sign with Nike, but instead of the generic Nike singlet, they wore an Oregon Track Club jersey, which was the first bit of differentiation among Nike athletes.

Meanwhile, Alberto Salazar created a group in 2001 in Portland. Seeing that Portland is also in Oregon, someone decided that his group was also the Oregon Track Club. Alberto Salazar had a heart attack in 2007 and recruited Jerry Schumacher as his replacement. Jerry brought a new crew while Alberto’s heart mended. There were three groups with three different coaches that hardly interacted with one another, wearing the same uniform.

In 2011, Oregon Project athletes started looking different. There was no formal announcement or marketing push, there was just a black uniform with a mysterious skull garnished with olive branches that Galen Rupp and company started wearing. Last year shoes and apparel with this logo became available through Nike catalogs to stores like ours. Enticed, we jumped on it instantly knowing that there is certainly a market for it.

Shalane Flanagan rocking her new kit (photo: entirelyamelia.com)

The process of differentiating the three Oregon groups completed earlier this year when Jerry Schumacher’s team became the Bowerman Track Club and Shalane Flanagan debuted their new uniform and logo at the Boston Marathon. The name originated from the local Portland team, Bowerman Athletic Club. The local youth and open athletes that were in BAC will be rolled into BTC with their new, very fast company.

So now, three of the premier track clubs in the country, each boasting Olympic medalists, finally have distinguishable brands and additional ability to cultivate a following. Hopefully, this inspires other premier clubs in the country, like the Brooks Beasts and Asics Mammoth Track Club, to produce gear for their fans as well.

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Scott Running Apparel, Running News, Running Sport , , , ,